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The #MeToo revolution will not take place in rap!


The #MeToo revolution will not happen in rap. It’s the era of whistleblowers. In the past two years, the world has witnessed two paradigm-shifting revolutions. The first, related to the Weinstein case, sparked the #MeToo movement in support of women’s rights in all their forms. The second, prompted by the death of George Floyd, led to the #BlackLivesMatter movement. While the second revolution has been widely embraced by the entire rap community, music as a whole has been less active in the #MeToo movement.

Is this revolution absent from the work of artists?

Booba’s song “Dolce Vita” is a perfect example of this phenomenon. The single’s cover features George Floyd, and during the track, Booba takes a jab at a well-known feminist pop singer, saying, “Balance ton misogyne à Angèle” in response to her song “Balance ton quoi?” from her debut album, Brol. Maes, on the other hand, dedicated a track to “George Floyd” in his collaboration with Lacrim. The #MeToo revolution will not happen in rap.

Among the staunch supporters of the #MeToo movement in hardcore rap, we primarily find someone like Chilla, who has frequently stood out for her outspoken feminist views. Her track “Balance ton porc” is not the only song where the rapper addresses feminism, but it’s undoubtedly the most emblematic. The #MeToo revolution will not take place in rap!

In the male domain, even though rappers enjoy jokingly calling each other “pointeurs” (which refers to someone who points things out), there are not many ardent defenders of the cause. However, we can mention someone like Vin’s. The rapper, who has created a triptych dedicated to the republican motto (Liberty, equality, fraternity) and is highly politically engaged, couldn’t help but be interested in the cause. He unveiled the track ” #MeToo” at the beginning of the feminist revolution.

Rap Artists Caught Up in #MeToo Stories!

Strangely enough, it’s Romeo Elvis and Moha La Squale who were the first to be affected by the “Balance ton rappeur” movement, the Hip-Hop equivalent of the #MeToo movement. Since June 2021, Moha La Squale has been facing charges of “sexual assault” and “violence” against former partners. Several women have accused the rapper from La Banane of mistreating them. The artist, once poised for a bright future in both cinema and music, has been profoundly impacted by the movement. He is currently in prison for violating his judicial control, maintaining his innocence throughout.

Even more surprising is the Roméo Elvis case. For those unfamiliar, the Belgian rapper is the brother of a certain Angèle, an icon of feminism. This situation did not sit well until, quite unusually, Roméo Elvis admitted to the wrongdoing and offered his apologies. He will not face prosecution, making him the only rapper to react in this manner. In reality, given the circumstances, he had no other choice. The #MeToo revolution will not take place in rap!

@zez_xxi

« C'était un geste déplacé » Roméo Elvis revient sur l'affaire d'agression sexuelle

♬ son original Zez XXI

The list is as long as your arm, with incidents involving RK, who seems to have been arrested for violence, or Kaaris, who has been making headlines in rap “tabloids” for similar reasons in recent weeks. But is the rap industry inherently more violent than others? To gain some insight, we posed the question to the godmother of somewhat provocative French artists, Liza Monet:

@zez_xxi @lizamonet7 te dit si elle a deja eu un probleme #metoo ♬ son original – Zez XXI

Reducing domestic violence within rap to the fact that most rappers come from “French neighborhoods” would be not only overly simplistic but also entirely caricatural. In reality, the tragedy of domestic and sexual violence is universal. The #MeToo revolution will not happen in rap!

And if the rap world is not yet having its #MeToo revolution, it may be because in France, it is predominantly a male-dominated environment.

ZEZ
ZEZ
C.E.O HELL SINKY, author, journalist, documentary

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